Shuttleworth: Ubuntu developer Canonical may need 3-5 more years of funding

Founder of unprofitable Linux vendor says he’s willing to continue bankrolling the company Canonical Ltd., the commercial backer of the Ubuntu Linux operating system, is not yet turning a profit, but founder Mark Shuttleworth said during a teleconference today that he is prepared to bankroll the company for three to five more years.

«We continue to require investment, and I continue to be careful with my pennies in making those investments, but I consider this a good proposition,» the billionaire technologist said. «Canonical is not cash-positive, but our offering is very attractive to those who want to pinch their pennies in the Linux space.»

The dismal economic climate could, in fact, drive more business for Ubuntu, Shuttleworth added optimistically.

Canonical, which brings in money by providing fee-based services and support for the Ubuntu software, currently has annual revenue in the range of «several million» dollars, Shuttleworth said. But the company’s low revenue and lack of profits hasn’t shaken his belief in its business model.

«We are entering a time when there’s a real commoditization of the desktop, so I don’t think it would be possible to make a lot of money, or even any money,» by trying to sell Linux itself, Shuttleworth said. «The only way to build businesses around Linux is around services.»

Shuttleworth held the teleconference in conjunction with this week’s upcomingUbuntu 8.10 release, which Canonicalannounced today. Ubuntu 8.10 includes improved 3G wireless support and new features such as a «guest» capability that lets users lend their PCs to other people to check e-mail and perform other tasks without disturbing the existing programs or settings.

Looking forward, Canonical expects Ubuntu’s development to embrace three key trends, Shuttleworth said: touch-based interactivity, 3-D imagery and the integration of Web-like features into the desktop user experience.

In the future, «most devices will have a touch dimension within them,» he said, adding that «the lines between the 2-D desktop and 3-D gaming environment are going to blur.»

 

Thanks to: here

Force a shutdown in Windows

rundll32.exe shell32.dll,SHExitWindowsEx 4

The above will shutdown any running processes and shutdown your computer without saving any data or warning. It should only be used if you have problems shutting down normally.

Note the numbers at the end of each of the above command lines. They are what make the different actions possible and they can be combined. The most common combination is using the Force shutdown action with a restart. Restart = 2 Force =4, so you would just add 6 to the end of the main command line:
rundll32.exe shell32.dll,SHExitWindowsEx 6

If your computer supports the power-off feature, you can also use the number 8 which is a Power Off action which will not only shutdown your computer, but turn off the power too.rundll32.exe shell32.dll,SHExitWindowsEx 8

To summarize:

0 = Logoff
1 = Shutdown
2 = Restart
4 = Forced Shutdown
8 = Power Off (Shutdown and turn off Power)

What is svchost.exe And Why Is It Running?

You are no doubt reading this article because you are wondering why on earth there are nearly a dozen processes running with the name svchost.exe. You can’t kill them, and you don’t remember starting them… so what are they?

So What Is It?

According to Microsoft: «svchost.exe is a generic host process name for services that run from dynamic-link libraries». Could we have that in english please?

Some time ago, Microsoft started moving all of the functionality from internal Windows services into .dll files instead of .exe files. From a programming perspective this makes more sense for reusability… but the problem is that you can’t launch a .dll file directly from Windows, it has to be loaded up from a running executable (.exe). Thus the svchost.exe process was born.

Why Are There So Many svchost.exes Running?

If you’ve ever taken a look at the Services section in control panel you might notice that there are a Lot of services required by Windows. If every single service ran under a single svchost.exe instance, a failure in one might bring down all of Windows… so they are separated out.

Those services are organized into logical groups, and then a single svchost.exe instance is created for each group. For instance, one svchost.exe instance runs the 3 services related to the firewall. Another svchost.exe instance might run all the services related to the user interface, and so on.

So What Can I Do About It?

You can trim down unneeded services by disabling or stopping the services that don’t absolutely need to be running. Additionally, if you are noticing very heavy CPU usage on a single svchost.exe instance you can restart the services running under that instance.

The biggest problem is identifying what services are being run on a particular svchost.exe instance… we’ll cover that below.

If you are curious what we’re talking about, just open up Task Manager and check the «Show processes from all users» box:

Vista task manager

Vista task manager

Checking From the Command Line (Vista or XP Pro)

If you want to see what services are being hosted by a particular svchost.exe instance, you can use the tasklist command from the command prompt in order to see the list of services.

tasklist /SVC

cmd Window

cmd Window

The problem with using the command line method is that you don’t necessarily know what these cryptic names refer to.

Checking in Task Manager in Vista

You can right-click on a particular svchost.exe process, and then choose the «Go to Service» option.

Task Manager

Task Manager

This will flip over to the Services tab, where the services running under that svchost.exe process will be selected:

Task Manager

Task Manager

The great thing about doing it this way is that you can see the real name under the Description column, so you can choose to disable the service if you don’t want it running.

Using Process Explorer in Vista or XP

You can use the excellent Process Explorer utility from Microsoft/Sysinternals to see what services are running as a part of a svchost.exe process.

Hovering your mouse over one of the processes will show you a popup list of all the services:

Process Explorer

Process Explorer

Or you can double-click on a svchost.exe instance and select the Services tab, where you can choose to stop one of the services if you choose.

svchost

svchost

Disabling Services

Open up Services from the administrative tools section of Control Panel, or typeservices.msc into the start menu search or run box.

Find the service in the list that you’d like to disable, and either double-click on it or right-click and choose Properties.

Services

Services

Change the Startup Type to Disabled, and then click the Stop button to immediately stop it.

DLTCP

DLTCP

You could also use the command prompt to disable the service if you choose. In this command «trkwks» is the Service name from the above dialog, but if you go back to the tasklist command at the beginning of this article you’ll notice you can find it there as well.

sc config trkwks start= disabled

 

Thanks to: HERE

How to Bounce a Message to the Sender in Leopard’s Mail.app

 

If you receive an email from someone that you really wish didn’t have your email address, you can make them think that they don’t. By using the Bounce functionality that is included in the OS X mail client to fool the pest into thinking that their email did not reach the intended goal. The sender will receive a notification that the email was not delivered because the addresses had permanent fatal errors and the user is unknown.

To Bounce a message from the Inbox:

1. Right-click the desired message.

2. Select Bounce from the menu.

 

 

The message will disappear from the Inbox.

To Bounce a message from the Message Window:

1. If you are viewing the trouble email, go to the Menu and select Message

2. Select Bounce.

Using Preview to Make timed Screenshots in Leopard

By using Preview’s Grab utility, you can easily make screenshots of your Mac desktop and application windows. While you can use various keyboard shortcuts to take screenshots, it is sometimes easier to use mouseclicks instead of the keyboard. Another advantage is that Preview gives you the option of taking timed screenshots that allow you 10 seconds to set up your shot before it snaps the screenshot.

 

1. Open Preview.

2. Go to the menu, click File, mouseover Grab and select one of the three options:

Selection – this option produces a crosshair cursor for you to click and drag around the area to be included in the screenshot.

Window – a camera cursor appears. Move the camera to the window that you want captured and left-click the mouse.

Timed Screen – you will be given 10 seconds before the screenshot is taken. This is helpful when trying to capture menus and submenus.

 

How to put your mac in Hibernation!

Mac OS X has this concept of «Sleep» and «Shutdown».    

By default, «Sleep» will turn the computer off but my MacBook Pro will still have the white light, switching between dim and bright. In this case, you cannot totally switch off your MacBook Pro as you would like to do in Windows.
However, if you «Sleep» using your laptop battery, once the battery runs out, MacBook Pro is smart enough to save all contents in your RAM to hard disk. This is called a «Safe Sleep«.
Wouldn’t it be nice if we could choose to hibernate whenever we want so that if we are not using the laptop for a few hours, instead of putting the laptop to «Sleep», which will still drain the battery, we can «hibernate» the laptop and restore our applications (as it is) when we start it up again.
Macworld has an article that contains comprehensive information about this. Here is the summary.
  • First find out what is the current setting of your sleep mode, using:
> pmset -g 
This will tell you which sleep mode you are currently on. The following displays different sleep mode:
0 – Legacy sleep mode. It will save everything to RAM upon sleeping but does not support «Safe Sleep». Very fast sleep.
1 – Legacy «Safe Sleep». This is the «Safe Sleep». Everything your laptop goes into sleep, it will save everything to harddisk. Slow on Sleep and Startup.
3 – Default. As described above, when sleeping, contents are saved to RAM. When battery runs out, hibernate occurs.
5 – Behaves as 1 but applicable only for modern Mac that uses «Secure virtual memory«.
7 – Behaves as 3 but applicable only for modern Mac that uses «Secure virtual memory«.
  • For me, I am using iMac and I know that I am using «Secure virtual memory» (System Preferences -> Security), so 5 is my choice. I want my Mac to hibernate everything I sleep.
  • Make an alias in your .bash_profile under your home directory:
alias hibernateon=»sudo pmset -a hibernatemode 5″
alias hibernateoff=»sudo pmset -a hibernatemode 0″
  • «Source» your bash_profile file and your are done!
  • Whenever you want to hibernate your computer, if it is not set already, just go to terminal and execute hibernateon. If you want to turn it off, hibernateoff and you are all set.

It was known that if you want to avoid hassle setting up in command line, there is a dashboard widget, called Deep Sleep that will do the trick do. Somehow it does not work on my iMac properly.