Google mail is offline?

It’s about time. Google has officially rolled out Gmail Offline, allowing users to read and compose mail even while they’re not connected to the internet.

As detailed in the announcement via the official Gmail blog, once you switch on Gmail Offline (as usual it’s in the labs tab under settings) Gmail uses Google Gears to download a local cache of your mail. When you’re connected to the web, Gmail works the same way it always has by making chit-chat with the Gmail servers. If you drop your connection, Gmail will switch to offline mode and use the information stored in the cache to allow you to keep doing all things Gmail. As soon as your signal comes back, all messaged saved to your outbox will be sent and you’ll be back in business with the Gmail servers.
This is something I’ve been waiting a long time. Working remotely is no picnic and those trans-Atlantic flights are a great time to answer emails and sort my inbox into something that resembles organized chaos.

Offline is being switched on for English UK and English U.S. users. If you don’t see it in Labs straight away, hold your horses and just chill for a bit — you should see it over the next days.

The new OLPC

OLPC2

 

Well, our interest was certainly piqued by that OLPC XO-2 mockup and now the Guardian is saying that the hardware development will take place open source. This is certainly fitting with the company’s idealistic ethos, and it’ll be interesting to see what other companies bring to the table as the reportedly $75 dual-screen device gets closer to real reality. “The XO-1 was really designed as if we were Apple,” Nicholas Negroponte says in the interview. “The XO-2 will be designed as if we were Google – we’ll want people to copy it. We’ll make the constituent parts available. We’ll try and get it out there using the exact opposite approach that we did with the XO-1.” He let a few details slip too, saying that it will be dual touchscreen, with one of the displays featuring a touch-sensitive, force-feedback, haptic keyboard. When asked how he feels about the possibility that other companies might profit from all this hard work developing the laptop of tomorrow? “I wouldn’t complain.” Class act, that one. Bravo.

India is building a 20$ laptop

Yes it is true!!! Forget OLPC, forget netbooks. Here comes the 20$ laptop from India.

It is much better than the OLPC XO that Negroponte wanted to reportedly charge the Indian government more than 2 years ago. This offer was rejected by officials with a promise to young Indians to do it better and for less. According to some reports (there is not anything official), the laptop will feature 2GB of memory, WiFi, fixed Ethernet, expandable memory, and consume just 2 watts of power.The Devil’s in the details, they say, but with any luck, India will be swimming in cheap silicon within the next 6 months if the project can keep to schedule… that’s a big IF.

 

Admire it in the following picture:

Mac OSX Leopard Snow vs Windows 7

AppleInsider has published an in depth look at the competitive origins of Windows 7 and Mac OS X and why the products aren’t really direct competitors.

The operating system most users end up with will depend upon what hardware they choose to buy, not the specific feature details of the software that system happens to run. History reveals that the hardware decision isn’t going to be based primarily upon features.

The following presents a historical overview of the competition between Apple and Microsoft in the operating system market leading up to this year’s face off between Windows 7 and Snow Leopard. While modern Macs can now also run Windows, Apple is the only PC maker to refrain from actually licensing it from Microsoft as an OEM; in contrast, Apple’s Mac OS X only legally runs on the company’s own premium PCs. That has enabled Mac OS X to differentiate Apple’s hardware from other PC vendors using easy to demonstrate software features and tighter hardware integration, winning back some of the ground Apple lost during the decade of the 90s.

Read More

 

MacOSX leopard Snow

MacOSX leopard Snow

 

Windows 7

Windows 7

HOW TO USE SHARED CALENDARS IN OUTLOOK

Having shared calendars is a great time saving feature that any business can use. It is a

way to keep track of meetings, conference room availability, co-worker availability and even

device availability such as a loaner laptop. If you have a Small Business Server or Exchange

Server and use Microsoft Outlook for your email, you already have the tools you need to

start using shared calendars.

How to Schedule a Meeting

1 Click on the Calendar button.

2 Click on New Appointment in the upper left.

3 In the New Appointment window you can type a username where it says Click here to

add a name. Hit enter after you type the name.

4 You will now see that user’s calendar. Busy time is indicated by a blue line and time

where they are out of the office is indicated by a purple line.

5 There are multiple ways to set a meeting time:

5.1 Use the green and red vertical lines to specify the start and end time of the

meeting. Make sure they don’t overlap busy time for any of the required attendees.

5.2 At the bottom of the New Appointment window (on the Scheduling tab) you will see

Meeting Start Time and Meeting End Time.

5.3 On the Appointment tab you will see Start Time and End Time in the middle

of the window.

6 Enter the subject and location of the meeting on the Appointment tab.

7 Attendees will also see any notes entered in the large white box at the bottom of

the Appointment tab.

How to View Someone Else’s Calendar

You must have the correct permissions setup to view another person’s calendar. There

are multiple ways to do view another person’s calendar:

1 You can follow the instructions under How to Schedule a Meeting.

2 You can also click on File, Open, Other User’s Folder. Type the name of the person

whose calendar you want to view and choose Calendar from the folder type dropdown.

Click OK. Once you’ve done this you will see that person’s calendar listed under Other

Calendars if you click on the Calendar button.

3 If you’ve previously viewed this person’s calendar, click on the Calendar button. Put a

checkmark next to their name under Other Calendars.

How to Change Permissions on Your Own Calendar

If you would like everyone to be able to view your calendar, make sure the default name has

the Reviewer permission level.

1 Click on the Calendar button.

2 Under My Calendars on the upper left, right click on Calendar and click on Properties.

3 Click on the Permissions tab.

4 You can review the current permissions listed in the white box at the top.

5 If you would like to remove a current permission, click on that name then click on the

Remove button.

6 To add a new permission, click on Add. Find the name that you would like to add in the

list, double click on it then click OK.

7 You can give that person default permission by choosing from the Permission Level

dropdown. You can also choose Custom Permissions just below that dropdown.

How to configure TCP/IP settings from the Command Prompt in Windows

In order to configure TCP/IP settings such as the IP address, Subnet Mask, Default Gateway, DNS and WINS addresses and many other options you can use Netsh.exe.

With Netsh.exe you can easily view your TCP/IP settings. Type the following command in a Command Prompt window (CMD.EXE):

netsh interface ip show config

With Netsh.exe, you can easily configure your computer’s IP address and other TCP/IP related settings. For example:

The following command configures the interface named Local Area Connection with the static IP address 10.0.0.100, the subnet mask of 255.255.255.0, and a default gateway of 10.0.0.1:

netsh interface ip set address name=”Local Area Connection” static 10.0.0.100 255.255.255.0 10.0.0.1 1 (The above is one long line)

If you want to export your current ip settings:

netsh -c interface dump > c:mySettings.txt 

If you want to import your ip settings:

netsh -f c:mySettings.txt

or instead of -f

netsh exec c:mySettings.txt

To automatically obatin an IP address using DHCP:

netsh interface ip set address “Local Area Connection” dhcp

DNS settings:

netsh interface ip set dns “Local Area Connection” static 10.0.0.254

WINS settings:

netsh interface ip set wins “Local Area Connection” static 10.0.0.254

Auto DNS settings:

netsh interface ip set dns “Local Area Connection” dhcp

Usefull links:

Link one and Link two

Cisco cli usefull key combinations

CLI Keys            Description

Ctrl + A            Beginning Line

Ctrl + B            Backward Character

Ctrl + C            Clear line

Ctrl + D            Delete Character to the Right

Ctrl + E            End Line

Ctrl + F            Forward Character

Ctrl + H            Backspace Character to the Left

Ctrl + I            Refresh Line and Goto End

Ctrl + J            Return

Ctrl + K            Delete everything on the Right of cursor

Ctrl + L            Refresh Line

Ctrl + M            Return

Ctrl + N            Next Command

Ctrl + P            Previous Command

Ctrl + R            Refresh Line

Ctrl + T            Flip Last 2 Characters

Ctrl + U            Clear Line and Put in Buffer

Ctrl + V            Allows A Control Character To Be Typed

Ctrl + W            Delete Word Backwards and Put in Buffer

Ctrl + X            Clear Line to the Left and Put in Buffer

Ctrl + Y            Paste Buffer Contents

How to use Kiosk Mode in Firefox

A simple way to initiate Kiosk Mode, with a lightweight plugin, in Firefox. This is a true kiosk mode as it prevents the user from doing anything but use the Internet.

These most known plugins are R-kiosk and Fullscreen.

So just open your firefox and install your prefered one.