Mac OSX Leopard Snow vs Windows 7

AppleInsider has published an in depth look at the competitive origins of Windows 7 and Mac OS X and why the products aren’t really direct competitors.

The operating system most users end up with will depend upon what hardware they choose to buy, not the specific feature details of the software that system happens to run. History reveals that the hardware decision isn’t going to be based primarily upon features.

The following presents a historical overview of the competition between Apple and Microsoft in the operating system market leading up to this year’s face off between Windows 7 and Snow Leopard. While modern Macs can now also run Windows, Apple is the only PC maker to refrain from actually licensing it from Microsoft as an OEM; in contrast, Apple’s Mac OS X only legally runs on the company’s own premium PCs. That has enabled Mac OS X to differentiate Apple’s hardware from other PC vendors using easy to demonstrate software features and tighter hardware integration, winning back some of the ground Apple lost during the decade of the 90s.

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MacOSX leopard Snow

MacOSX leopard Snow

 

Windows 7

Windows 7

HOW TO USE SHARED CALENDARS IN OUTLOOK

Having shared calendars is a great time saving feature that any business can use. It is a

way to keep track of meetings, conference room availability, co-worker availability and even

device availability such as a loaner laptop. If you have a Small Business Server or Exchange

Server and use Microsoft Outlook for your email, you already have the tools you need to

start using shared calendars.

How to Schedule a Meeting

1 Click on the Calendar button.

2 Click on New Appointment in the upper left.

3 In the New Appointment window you can type a username where it says Click here to

add a name. Hit enter after you type the name.

4 You will now see that user’s calendar. Busy time is indicated by a blue line and time

where they are out of the office is indicated by a purple line.

5 There are multiple ways to set a meeting time:

5.1 Use the green and red vertical lines to specify the start and end time of the

meeting. Make sure they don’t overlap busy time for any of the required attendees.

5.2 At the bottom of the New Appointment window (on the Scheduling tab) you will see

Meeting Start Time and Meeting End Time.

5.3 On the Appointment tab you will see Start Time and End Time in the middle

of the window.

6 Enter the subject and location of the meeting on the Appointment tab.

7 Attendees will also see any notes entered in the large white box at the bottom of

the Appointment tab.

How to View Someone Else’s Calendar

You must have the correct permissions setup to view another person’s calendar. There

are multiple ways to do view another person’s calendar:

1 You can follow the instructions under How to Schedule a Meeting.

2 You can also click on File, Open, Other User’s Folder. Type the name of the person

whose calendar you want to view and choose Calendar from the folder type dropdown.

Click OK. Once you’ve done this you will see that person’s calendar listed under Other

Calendars if you click on the Calendar button.

3 If you’ve previously viewed this person’s calendar, click on the Calendar button. Put a

checkmark next to their name under Other Calendars.

How to Change Permissions on Your Own Calendar

If you would like everyone to be able to view your calendar, make sure the default name has

the Reviewer permission level.

1 Click on the Calendar button.

2 Under My Calendars on the upper left, right click on Calendar and click on Properties.

3 Click on the Permissions tab.

4 You can review the current permissions listed in the white box at the top.

5 If you would like to remove a current permission, click on that name then click on the

Remove button.

6 To add a new permission, click on Add. Find the name that you would like to add in the

list, double click on it then click OK.

7 You can give that person default permission by choosing from the Permission Level

dropdown. You can also choose Custom Permissions just below that dropdown.

How to configure TCP/IP settings from the Command Prompt in Windows

In order to configure TCP/IP settings such as the IP address, Subnet Mask, Default Gateway, DNS and WINS addresses and many other options you can use Netsh.exe.

With Netsh.exe you can easily view your TCP/IP settings. Type the following command in a Command Prompt window (CMD.EXE):

netsh interface ip show config

With Netsh.exe, you can easily configure your computer’s IP address and other TCP/IP related settings. For example:

The following command configures the interface named Local Area Connection with the static IP address 10.0.0.100, the subnet mask of 255.255.255.0, and a default gateway of 10.0.0.1:

netsh interface ip set address name=»Local Area Connection» static 10.0.0.100 255.255.255.0 10.0.0.1 1 (The above is one long line)

If you want to export your current ip settings:

netsh -c interface dump > c:mySettings.txt 

If you want to import your ip settings:

netsh -f c:mySettings.txt

or instead of -f

netsh exec c:mySettings.txt

To automatically obatin an IP address using DHCP:

netsh interface ip set address «Local Area Connection» dhcp

DNS settings:

netsh interface ip set dns «Local Area Connection» static 10.0.0.254

WINS settings:

netsh interface ip set wins «Local Area Connection» static 10.0.0.254

Auto DNS settings:

netsh interface ip set dns «Local Area Connection» dhcp

Usefull links:

Link one and Link two

How to login as an administrator in Windows XP

The built-in Administrator account is hidden from Welcome Screen when a user account with Administrator privileges exists and enabled. In Windows XP Home Edition, you can login as built-in Administrator in Safe Mode only. For XP Professional, press CTRL + ALT + DEL twice at the Welcome Screen and input your Administrator password in the classic logon window that appears.

HAL.DLL is Missing

Option 1:

Boot from your CD and follow the directions to start Recovery Console. Then:

Attrib -H -R -S C:Boot.ini

DEL C:Boot.ini

BootCfg /Rebuild

Fixboot

 

Option 2:

Boot from your CD and follow the directions below to start Recovery Console.

Insert the Setup compact disc (CD) and restart the computer. If prompted, select any options required to boot from the CD. 
When the text-based part of Setup begins, follow the prompts; choose the repair or recover option by pressing R. 

If you have a dual-boot or multiple-boot system, choose the installation that you need to access from the Recovery Console. 
When prompted, type the Administrator password. (if you didn’t create one try pressing enter).

At the system prompt, type Recovery Console commands; type help for a list of commands, or help commandname for help on a specific command. 

Most likely you will need to expand the file from the CD. The command would be expand d:i386hal.dl_ c:windowssystem32hal.dll. Substitute d: for the drive letter of your CD. Once you have expanded the file type «exit» to exit the Recovery Console and restart the computer.  

TIP:  Recovering Windows XP using the Recovery Console

Force a shutdown in Windows

rundll32.exe shell32.dll,SHExitWindowsEx 4

The above will shutdown any running processes and shutdown your computer without saving any data or warning. It should only be used if you have problems shutting down normally.

Note the numbers at the end of each of the above command lines. They are what make the different actions possible and they can be combined. The most common combination is using the Force shutdown action with a restart. Restart = 2 Force =4, so you would just add 6 to the end of the main command line:
rundll32.exe shell32.dll,SHExitWindowsEx 6

If your computer supports the power-off feature, you can also use the number 8 which is a Power Off action which will not only shutdown your computer, but turn off the power too.rundll32.exe shell32.dll,SHExitWindowsEx 8

To summarize:

0 = Logoff
1 = Shutdown
2 = Restart
4 = Forced Shutdown
8 = Power Off (Shutdown and turn off Power)

What is svchost.exe And Why Is It Running?

You are no doubt reading this article because you are wondering why on earth there are nearly a dozen processes running with the name svchost.exe. You can’t kill them, and you don’t remember starting them… so what are they?

So What Is It?

According to Microsoft: «svchost.exe is a generic host process name for services that run from dynamic-link libraries». Could we have that in english please?

Some time ago, Microsoft started moving all of the functionality from internal Windows services into .dll files instead of .exe files. From a programming perspective this makes more sense for reusability… but the problem is that you can’t launch a .dll file directly from Windows, it has to be loaded up from a running executable (.exe). Thus the svchost.exe process was born.

Why Are There So Many svchost.exes Running?

If you’ve ever taken a look at the Services section in control panel you might notice that there are a Lot of services required by Windows. If every single service ran under a single svchost.exe instance, a failure in one might bring down all of Windows… so they are separated out.

Those services are organized into logical groups, and then a single svchost.exe instance is created for each group. For instance, one svchost.exe instance runs the 3 services related to the firewall. Another svchost.exe instance might run all the services related to the user interface, and so on.

So What Can I Do About It?

You can trim down unneeded services by disabling or stopping the services that don’t absolutely need to be running. Additionally, if you are noticing very heavy CPU usage on a single svchost.exe instance you can restart the services running under that instance.

The biggest problem is identifying what services are being run on a particular svchost.exe instance… we’ll cover that below.

If you are curious what we’re talking about, just open up Task Manager and check the «Show processes from all users» box:

Vista task manager

Vista task manager

Checking From the Command Line (Vista or XP Pro)

If you want to see what services are being hosted by a particular svchost.exe instance, you can use the tasklist command from the command prompt in order to see the list of services.

tasklist /SVC

cmd Window

cmd Window

The problem with using the command line method is that you don’t necessarily know what these cryptic names refer to.

Checking in Task Manager in Vista

You can right-click on a particular svchost.exe process, and then choose the «Go to Service» option.

Task Manager

Task Manager

This will flip over to the Services tab, where the services running under that svchost.exe process will be selected:

Task Manager

Task Manager

The great thing about doing it this way is that you can see the real name under the Description column, so you can choose to disable the service if you don’t want it running.

Using Process Explorer in Vista or XP

You can use the excellent Process Explorer utility from Microsoft/Sysinternals to see what services are running as a part of a svchost.exe process.

Hovering your mouse over one of the processes will show you a popup list of all the services:

Process Explorer

Process Explorer

Or you can double-click on a svchost.exe instance and select the Services tab, where you can choose to stop one of the services if you choose.

svchost

svchost

Disabling Services

Open up Services from the administrative tools section of Control Panel, or typeservices.msc into the start menu search or run box.

Find the service in the list that you’d like to disable, and either double-click on it or right-click and choose Properties.

Services

Services

Change the Startup Type to Disabled, and then click the Stop button to immediately stop it.

DLTCP

DLTCP

You could also use the command prompt to disable the service if you choose. In this command «trkwks» is the Service name from the above dialog, but if you go back to the tasklist command at the beginning of this article you’ll notice you can find it there as well.

sc config trkwks start= disabled

 

Thanks to: HERE

Display Run on Vista

Displaying Run on the vista Desktop:

You can create a shortcut for the Run command on your desktop. From the Start Menu, go to All Programs / Accessories. Drag a shortcut for Run to the desktop.

Displaying Run on the Start Menu:

By default, Run is not shown when you open the Start Menu. To enable this Right click on the taskbar, Select Properties, Click on the Start Menu tab, Click on the Customize button, Scroll down and check Run (it’s about 2/3’s of the way towards the bottom.

Access Denied error in windows vista

When you try to access some windows folder like document and setting you may get error message that “access denied”. you need to change ownership of this folder. So open properties by right click on it. In security button select advance tab and click edit button. Now change ownership to your account by highlighting your account and also select replace ownership to sub containers and apply changes.