Flash, Video Conferencing Coming to the iPhone?

During an interview with Bloomberg, Adobe CEO Shantanu Narayen revealed that his company is indeed working on Flash for the iPhone. In development since June of last year, Narayen had some answers for a Flash-hungry public. “It’s a hard technical challenge, and that’s part of the reason Apple and Adobe are collaborating,” said Narayen. “The ball is in our court. The onus is on us to deliver.»

Back in June of 2007, Apple’s iPhone hit the market like a proverbial bull in a china shop. After millions sold, the iPhone 3G improved on nearly everything the original had to offer when it was released in 2008, including the ever-so-popular App Store. Despite the success, there was always something (several things) missing. Cut and paste for text was near the top, but full-fledged Adobe Flash support tops the charts for «most desired iPhone upgrade». Well, Flash may finally come to the iPhone.

Last year, Apple co-founder and CEO Steve Jobs called on Adobe to bring Flash to the iPhone. However, he wanted a third version of the software. The original Flash player found on nearly every desktop and laptop on the planet was too demanding for the iPhone’s underclocked ARM CPU. While Flash Lite is a smaller, more nimble cousin of the original, Jobs called it incapable of delivering what he wanted for his smartphone.

As of 3:20pm EST, Adobe stock was two cents off its opening price of USD $19.41, but had rebound from the days low of $18.96.

In other iPhone news, a recently discovered patent reveals that video conferencing may be coming soon as well. However, the feature would likely be part of the next iPhone iteration and not available on current hardware. “The device supports a variety of applications,» said InformationWeek’s Alexander Wolfe, «such as one or more of the following: a telephone application, a video conferencing application, an e-mail application, an instant messaging application, a blogging application, a photo management application, a digital camera application, a digital video camera application, a Web browsing application, a digital music player application, and/or a digital video player application.”

All in all, the device sounds like an iPhone. However, the addition of video conferencing and digital video capturing would definitely be a step up for the Cupertino smartphone. That combined with Flash, and Apple would have yet another hot phone on its hands.

How to put your mac in Hibernation!

Mac OS X has this concept of «Sleep» and «Shutdown».    

By default, «Sleep» will turn the computer off but my MacBook Pro will still have the white light, switching between dim and bright. In this case, you cannot totally switch off your MacBook Pro as you would like to do in Windows.
However, if you «Sleep» using your laptop battery, once the battery runs out, MacBook Pro is smart enough to save all contents in your RAM to hard disk. This is called a «Safe Sleep«.
Wouldn’t it be nice if we could choose to hibernate whenever we want so that if we are not using the laptop for a few hours, instead of putting the laptop to «Sleep», which will still drain the battery, we can «hibernate» the laptop and restore our applications (as it is) when we start it up again.
Macworld has an article that contains comprehensive information about this. Here is the summary.
  • First find out what is the current setting of your sleep mode, using:
> pmset -g 
This will tell you which sleep mode you are currently on. The following displays different sleep mode:
0 – Legacy sleep mode. It will save everything to RAM upon sleeping but does not support «Safe Sleep». Very fast sleep.
1 – Legacy «Safe Sleep». This is the «Safe Sleep». Everything your laptop goes into sleep, it will save everything to harddisk. Slow on Sleep and Startup.
3 – Default. As described above, when sleeping, contents are saved to RAM. When battery runs out, hibernate occurs.
5 – Behaves as 1 but applicable only for modern Mac that uses «Secure virtual memory«.
7 – Behaves as 3 but applicable only for modern Mac that uses «Secure virtual memory«.
  • For me, I am using iMac and I know that I am using «Secure virtual memory» (System Preferences -> Security), so 5 is my choice. I want my Mac to hibernate everything I sleep.
  • Make an alias in your .bash_profile under your home directory:
alias hibernateon=»sudo pmset -a hibernatemode 5″
alias hibernateoff=»sudo pmset -a hibernatemode 0″
  • «Source» your bash_profile file and your are done!
  • Whenever you want to hibernate your computer, if it is not set already, just go to terminal and execute hibernateon. If you want to turn it off, hibernateoff and you are all set.

It was known that if you want to avoid hassle setting up in command line, there is a dashboard widget, called Deep Sleep that will do the trick do. Somehow it does not work on my iMac properly.

POSSIBLE CAUSES OF SLOW INTERNET UNDER LEOPARD

• Use better faster DNS servers, like OpenDNS.org (208.67.222.222, 208.67.220.220).
• Connect directly to DNS servers to avoid DNS forwarding through your router (acting as a DNS proxy).
• Turn off IPv6 DNS lookups in Firefox/Camino (references: mozilla.org).
• If DNS forwarding is required, change the DNS servers directly on the router.
• Update your router’s firmware (references: jungledisk.com, ubuntu.com) for better SRV and IPv6 handling.
• Below are detailed instructions on applying these fixes to slow dns lookups/slow Internet on Leopard

Linux User’s Guide to Mac: Terminal

Few things in Unix match the importance of the terminal emulator.  Having a nice GUI is fine, but nothing beats the command line, which some have said is the «front line» of computing. As an official member of the Brotherhood of the Commandline, I have always kept at least one terminal window open at all times, and often three or more.

In Mac Land, that’s Terminal. Yes, I could run the X server and use Xterm, but that would be a step backward from the one thing which drove me away from Unix in the first place. I came to Mac because I didn’t have to use the X server to get a GUI, since Mac has the best one out there. Whatever I needed to do on the command line requires making Terminal do it right. By default, Terminal has some rather odd behavior for someone coming from Unix, and more if your Unix is Linux. Most of it can be changed. One thing you will not get is the mouse-paste. That’s unique to the X server. Sure, you can get a mouse driver for Logitech or Intellimouse which will let you alter the wheel button behavior, but it breaks other, more versatile and useful behavior, so you might as well get used to Cmd+C and Cmd+V. But most other things can be adjusted to behave as we Unix people have come to expect.

For this demonstration, I’m using Joe as the application which will most readily lend itself to explaining what we need to do. Joe’s Own Editor offers a quick and easy method to editing the configuration file to add non-default keystrokes. A couple of years ago I wrote a HOWTO on customizing Joe’s keystrokes based on work by Anne Baretta and a few tips garnered here and there. In our last installment, we covered installing Joe and Aspell, so I’m assuming you either have them already, or can grasp what follows without them.

First, grab a copy of your system joerc for your $HOME folder (using the command line, of course):

cp /usr/local/etc/joe/joerc ~/

cp /usr/local/etc/joe/ftyperc ~/

If you have the latest version of Joe, you’ll probably want to modify the ftyperc for your own use, as I do. But first, we have to understand the fundamental difference between Mac’s Terminal and your generic Xterm. Terminal has some different default actions assigned to some of the keystrokes. More, as my HOWTO encourages assigning F-keys to Joe actions, you’ll need to consider doing something I did: turn them off in the Mac GUI.

For serious Mac users, this is probably anathema. For Unix users, having all or most of the F-keys available for the applications is pretty important. In Mac’s System Preferences, go to Keyboard & Mouse, and open Keyboard Shortcuts. For me, the simplest answer was to en masse turn off «Keyboard Navigation» shortcuts because I use the mouse for those things, if at all. Then I added «Dock, Expose and Dashboard» because I can’t imagine why I would want them. Your mileage may vary, but if you want the F-keys for Terminal, consider it.

In my HOWTO on Joe’s keystrokes, I point out the method of determining what keycodes are output by your terminal emulator of choice, by hitting CTRL+V, followed by any other key or combination with modifiers. This works in Terminal. However, you’ll notice they all include the «escape sequence» of ^[ which represents hitting the ESC, but forms a part of what Joe needs to interpret custom keystrokes. However, when you open the Preferences dialog in Terminal, choose a profile (I set Pro as my default), and click on the «Keyboard» setting page, you’ll see most of them are in the pattern of 33xxxx. If you understand that 33 is equivalent to ^[, you can do this.

Now, scanning down through the list of default keystrokes in this dialog, we see why the «gray keys» won’t work without holding down the SHIFT key. Change those assignments. You’ll need to assign them to a «string» instead of any of the optional actions. Just select any of the gray key names and then click «Edit» and select the option to send a string. Below are various strings as they are output in most Xterms, which is what most command line applications are expecting, even when compiled on Mac. I have broken down the spacing as Joe uses the Xterm output, according to the instructions in my HOWTO.

Keystroke

Joe format

Mac label

Terminal format

Right

^[ [ C

cursor right

33[C

 

CTRL+RT

^[ [ 1 ; 5 C

control cursor right

33[1;5C

ALT+RT

^[ [ 1 ; 3 C

option cursor right

33[1;3C

In order to tell Terminal to output that second command as I wished, I had to remove the default and tell it to send the string in the last column of the second row above. Furthermore, I have to warn you the dialog will attempt to interpret any deleting keystrokes, so neither DEL nor BKSP can be used to clear a string in that dialog. You’ll need to highlight with the mouse, then either overtype or paste what you want there.

Below are all the arrow keys and gray keys except the HELP and DEL keys on Mac keyboards. Use those you need. In some cases, you’ll have to use the + button the dialog interface to add the keystrokes not included by default, along with any modifiers.

Keystroke

Joe format

Mac label

Terminal format

Left

^[ [ D

cursor left

33[D

CTRL+LF

^[ [ 1 ; 5 D

control cursor left

33[1;5D

ALT+LF

^[ [ 1 ; 3 D

option cursor left

33[1;3D

UP

^[ [ A

cursor up

33[A

CTRL+UP

^[ [ 1 ; 5 A

control cursor up

33[1;5A

ALT+UP

^[ [ 1 ; 3 A

option cursor up

33[1;3A

DN

^[ [ B

cursor down

33[B

CTRL+DN

^[ [ 1 ; 5 B

control cursor down

33[1;5B

ALT+DN

^[ [ 1 ; 3 B

option cursor down

33[1;3B

HOME

^[ [ H

home

33[H

CTRL+HOME

^[ [ 1 ; 5 H

control home

33[1;5H

ALT+HOME

^[ [ 1 ; 3 H

option home

33[1;3H

END

^[ [ F

end

33[F

CTRL+END

^[ [ 1 ; 5 F

control end

33[1;5F

ALT+END

^[ [ 1 ; 3 F

option end

33[1;3F

PGUP

^[ [ 5 ~

page up

33[5~

CTRL+PGUP

^[ [ 5 ; 5 ~

control page up

33[5;5~

ALT+PGUP

^[ [ 5 ; 3 ~

option page up

33[5;3~

PGDN

^[ [ 6 ~

page down

33[6~

CTRL+PGDN

^[ [ 6 ; 5 ~

control page down

33[6;5~

ALT+PGDN

^[ [ 6 ; 3 ~

option page down

33[6;3~

Once you have told Terminal what keystrokes you want added and the strings to send, you are ready to edit your joerc according to the HOWTO linked above. Note that the ftyperc is where you put your specific options regarding various filetypes. For plain text (.txt), I use the following format options:

Text file. *.txt

-wordwrap

-tab 3

-indentc 32

-istep 1

-spaces

-purify

-rmargin 72

-french

I use the same for HTML files. The explantion for each one can be found in the joerc file.

There is one more peculiarity I’ve found in Terminal. For some strange reason, F1-F3 tend to output something different than what Joe expects, and probably most other command line programs from Unix. In my joerc, instead of using the standard .k1, I had to pickup the code output from Terminal as revealed by the command CTRL+V: ^[OP. Then, I placed this in my joerc where I wanted to use F1, after spacing it out properly. I did the same for F2 and F3.

After you’ve added your custom keystrokes and commands to joerc, make sure to change the «include» statement for your ftyperc (approximately line 360). It must be the full path. Mine says this:

:include /Users/edhurst/.ftyperc

Which brings up the last point of renaming them both by adding a period to the front of the file so they are read as configuration files:

mv joerc .joerc

mv ftyperc .ftyperc

After modifying the Terminal profile keystrokes, I tested a few other applications and they seemed to work okay. Enjoy.

 

Taken from: Open For Business

MAC OSX Leopard keyboard shortcuts

1

Cmd-C

Copy files

2

Cmd-V

Paste files

3

Option-Drag

Copy files to new location

4

Cmd-Drag

Move and auto-align icons

5

Cmd-Delete

Delete

6

Cmd-Option-Drag

Make alias

7

Cmd-Shift-Delete

Empty trash

8

Cmd-Shift-Option-Delete

Empty trash without warning

9

Tab

Select next field

10

Shift-Tab

Select previous field

11

Return

Perform default action

12

Escape

Close dialog box

13

Page Up

Scroll up list

14

Up Arrow

Select item above

15

Page Down

Scroll down list

16

Down Arrow

Select item below

17

Cmd-Shift-G

Open ‘Go to Folder’ dialog

18

Cmd-Period[.]

Close dialog box

Exposé, Space, Dashboard and the System

19

F8

Toggle Space

20

Shift-F8

Toggle Space in slow motion

21

F9

Show all open windows

22

Shift-F9

Show all open windows in slow motion

23

F10

Show all open windows for an application

24

Shift-F10

Show all open windows for an application in slow motion

25

F11

Hide all windows

26

Shift-F11

Hide all windows in slow motion

27

F12

Open/close Dashboard

28

Shift-F12

Slowly open/close Dashboard

29

Option-Mouse Hover

Reveal the close button of widget

30

Shift-Click Close Button

Animate closing widget in slow motion

31

Cmd-H

Hide application

32

Cmd-Option-H

Hide other applications

33

Cmd-Q

Quit application

34

Cmd-Shift-Q

Quit all applications and log out

35

Cmd-Option-Shift-Q

Log out without warning

36

Cmd-Tab

Switch to next application

37

Cmd-Shift-Tab

Switch to previous application

38

Option-Drag

Adjust volume (on sound volume slider)

39

Cmd-Drag

Arrange menu bar items

40

Option-Click

Switch window and hide current window

41

Control-Click

Open contextual menu

42

Cmd-Control-D

See word definition (with mouse hover)

Issue: Freeze

43

Cmd-Period[.]

Stop process

44

Cmd-Option-Escape

Open Force Quit

45

Power Key

Turn off

46

Cmd-Option-Shift-Power Key

Force shut down

47

Cmd-Control-Power Key

Force restart

Full Keyboard Access

48

Control-F1

Turn on/off full keyboard access

49

Control-F2

Focusing menu bar

50

Control-F3

Focusing Dock

51

Control-F4

Move to next window

52

Control-F5

Move to toolbar

53

Control-F6

Move to a floating window

54

Control-F7

Toggle keyboard access mode

55

Control-F8

Focusing status menu in menu bar

56

Cmd-Accent[`]

Switch to next window within application

57

Cmd-Shift-Accent[`]

Switch to previous window within application

58

Cmd-Option-Accent[`]

Move to sidebar

59

Cmd-Option-T

Toggle on/off character palette

Finder

60

Cmd-Click on Title

See the path enclosing folders

61

Cmd-Double-Click (on folder)

Open folder in new window

62

Option-Double-Click (on folder)

Open folder in new window and close current window

63

Cmd-1

Switch to icon view

64

Cmd-2

Switch to list view

65

Cmd-Option-Right Arrow

Expand folder

66

Left Arrow

Close folder

67

Cmd-Down Arrow

Open selected folder

68

Cmd-Option-Down Arrow

Open selected folder in new window and close current folder

69

Cmd-Shift-Option-Down Arrow

Open selected folder in new window and close current folder in slow motion

70

Cmd-Up Arrow

Show enclosing folder

71

Cmd-Option-Up Arrow

Show enclosing folder and close current folder

72

Cmd-3

Switch to column view

73

Cmd-4

Switch to coverflow view

74

Cmd-Y

Toggle Quick Look mode

75

Cmd-Option-Y

Toggle Slideshow mode

76

Cmd-Shift-H

Open home folder

77

Cmd-Option-Shift-Up Arrow

Move focus to Desktop

78

Cmd-Shift-I

Open iDisk

79

Cmd-Shift-D

Open Desktop

80

Cmd-Shift-C

Open Computer area

81

Cmd-Shift-K

Open Network

82

Cmd-Shift-A

Open Applications

83

Double-Click on Title

Minimize window

84

Cmd-M

Minimize window

85

Option-Click on button

Apply action to all windows in active application

86

Hold-Scroll Bar

Scroll quickly

Search: Spotlight

87

Cmd-Spacebar

Activate/deactivate Spotlight

88

Cmd-Option-Spacebar

Open Spotlight window

89

Cmd-Return

Open the top hit

90

Cmd-Down Arrow

Move to next category

91

Cmd-Up Arrow

Move to previous category

92

Cmd-Click

Open selected item in Finder

93

Escape

Close Spotlight

Utility: Print Screen

94

Cmd-Shift-3

Take snapshot of the whole screen

95

Cmd-Shift-4

Take snapshot of the selected area

96

Cmd-Shift-4-Spacebar

Take picture of a window

97

Escape

Cancel

98

Hold Spacebar after Drawing the region

Move the selected area

99

Hold Option

Resize selected area

100

Hold Shift

Resize selected area horizontally or vertically

Application: Dock

101

Drag the separator

Resize Dock

102

Option-Drag

Resize Dock to fixed size

103

Control-Click

Show Dock’s contextual menu

104

Control-Click on icon

Show item’s contextual menu

105

Cmd-Click

Open the icon’s enclosing folder

106

Option-Click

Switch to another and hide current application

107

Cmd-Option-Click

Switch to another application and hide all other applications

108

Cmd-Option-Drop

Force application to open files

109

Cmd-Option-D

Hide/unhide Dock

Preference: Universal Access

110

Cmd-Option-8

Turn zoom on/off

111

Cmd-Option-Equal[=]

Zoom in

112

Control-Scroll Up

Zoom in

113

Cmd-Option-Hyphen[-]

Zoom out

114

Control-Scroll Down

Zoom out

115

Cmd-Option-Control-8

Invert color (try this on those iMacs in Apple Store)

116

Control-Option-Cmd-Comma[,]

Reduce contrast

117

Control-Option-Cmd-Period[.]

Increase contrast

118

Cmd-F5

Toggle VoiceOver

119

Shift-Shift-Shift-Shift-Shift (5 times)

Toggle Sticky Keys

120

Option-Option-Option-Option-Option (5 times)

Toggle mouse keys

Boot: Start Up

These shortcuts only available during start up.

121

Shift

Prevent automatic login

122

Shift

Enter safe mode (hold down after startup tone and release after you see the progress indicator)

123

Shift

Prevent opening Login Items (after login)

124

C

Boot from CD

125

N

Boot from default NetBook disk

126

T

Start up in Target Disk Mode

127

Option

Select startup disk

128

Cmd-X

Start up using Mac OS X

129

Hold Mouse Button

Eject removable discs

130

Cmd-Option-P-R

Reset parameter RAM

131

Cmd-V

Verbose mode (detailed status message)

132

Cmd-S

Single user mode

Browser: Safari

133

Cmd-Option-F

Move to Google Search Box

134

Option-Up Arrow

Scroll Up

135

Option-Down Arrow

Scroll Down

136

Cmd-Click Link

Open in new tab and stay in current tab

137

Cmd-Shift-Click Link

Open and go to new tab

138

Cmd-Option-Click Link

Open in new window

139

Option-Click Close Button

Close other tabs

140

Cmd-Shift-]

Select next tab

141

Cmd-Shift-[

Select previous tab

142

Cmd-Shift-H

Go to homepage

143

Cmd-Shift-K

Toggle Block Pop-up Windows

144

Cmd-Option-E

Empty Cache

145

Cmd-Option-R

Reload page without Caching

146

Cmd-F

Search term in webpage

147

Cmd-M

Minimize Safari

148

Shift-Click Button

Animate slow motion effect

149

Cmd-Plus[+]

Increase font size

150

Cmd-Hyphen[-]

Reduce font size

151

Cmd-0

Original font size

Music: iTunes

152

Return/Space

Play

153

Option-Right Arrow

Select next album

154

Option-Left Arrow

Select previous album

155

Cmd-Right Arrow

Play next song

156

Cmd-Left Arrow

Play previous song

157

Option-Click on Shuffle Button

Reshuffle

158

Cmd-Option-Down Arrow

Mute

159

Cmd-E

Eject CD

160

Cmd-T

Turn on/off visualizer

161

Cmd-F

Turn on/off full screen mode

162

Cmd-1

View iTunes window

163

Cmd-2

View equalizer mode

Terminal

164

Double-Click

Select word

165

Triple-Click

Select line

166

Drag item to Terminal

Add the complete path to that item

167

Cmd-N

Create new shell window

168

Cmd-Shift-N

Enter new command

169

Cmd-Shift-K

Connect to a server

170

Cmd-Option-S

Save text

171

Cmd-Option-Shift-S

Save selected text

172

Cmd-I

Show terminal inspector

173

Cmd-T

Create new tab

174

Control-C

Break

Mail: Hello from Cupertino

175

Cmd-N

New message

176

Cmd-Shift-N

Get new mail

177

Cmd-Option-N

Open new viewer window

178

Cmd-0

Open activity window

179

Cmd-Shift-Y

Add senders to address book

180

Cmd-E

Use selected text to find

181

Cmd-C while selecting message

Copy entire text of a message

182

Cmd-Click on upper-right corner toolbar button

Switch different toolbar display

183

Cmd-Single Quote[‘]

Increase quote level

184

Cmd-Option-Single Quote[‘]

Decrease quote level

185

Cmd-Shift-E

Redirect message

186

Cmd-Shift-F

Forward message

187

Hold Option when deleting message

Prevent next message from being automatically marked as read

188

Cmd-Shift-R

Reply to all

189

Cmd-Shift-B

Bounce to sender

190

Cmd-Shift-T

Convert message to rich text or plain text

191

Cmd-Left Brace[{]

Align left

192

Cmd-Vertical Bar[|]

Align center

193

Cmd-Right Brace[}]

Align right

194

Cmd-Colon[:]

Check spelling

195

Cmd-Semicolon[;]

Flag misspelling of selected word

Front Row

196

Cmd-Esc

Open/close Front Row or return to previous menu

197

Spacebar, Return

Select item in a menu

198

Up Arrow, Down Arrow

Change volume

199

Right Arrow, Left Arrow

Go to next or previous selection

Address Book

200

Cmd-1

View card and columns

201

Cmd-2

View only card

202

Cmd-3

View directories

203

Cmd-Right Bracket[‘]’]

Next card

204

Cmd-Left Bracker[‘[‘]

Previous card

205

Cmd-Vertical Line[|]

Merge selected cards

206

Cmd-Backslash[]

Set as company card

Image Editor: Adobe Photoshop

207

Cmd-Shift-M

Edit in ImageReady

208

Cmd-Option-W

Close all

209

Cmd-Option-S

Save as

210

Cmd-Option-Shift-S

Save for Web

211

Cmd-Option-Shift-I

File info

212

Cmd-Option-P

Print with Preview

213

Cmd-Option-Shift-P

Print one copy

214

Cmd-Shift-F

Fade

215

Cmd-Shift-C

Copy merged

216

Cmd-Shift-V

Paste into

217

Shift-F5

Fill with color

218

Cmd-Shift-T

Transform Again

219

Cmd-Option-Shift-K

Show keyboard shortcuts

220

Cmd-L

Adjust levels

221

Cmd-M

Adjust curves

222

Cmd-B

Adjust color balance

223

Cmd-U

Adjust hue/saturation

224

Cmd-Option-C

Change canvas size

225

Cmd-Shift-N

Create new layer

226

Cmd-J

Layer via copy

227

Cmd-Shift-J

Layer via cut

228

Cmd-Option-G

Create/release clipping mask

229

Cmd-G

Group layers

230

Cmd-Shift-E

Merge visible

231

Cmd-Shift-I

Select inverse

232

Cmd-Option-A

Select all layers

233

Shift-F6

Select feather (Cmd-Option-D has been assigned to hide Dock)

234

Cmd-Option-V

Filter vanishing point

235

Cmd-Plus[+]

Zoom in

236

Cmd-0

Fit on screen

237

Cmd-Option-0

Display actual pixels

238

Cmd-Single Quote[‘]

Show grid

239

Cmd-Semicolon[;]

Show guides

240

Cmd-R

Show rulers

 Taken from: UsingMac.com